↠ Salvador☆ Kindle Author ↠ Joan Didion georgian romance – groundhogwalking.co.uk

Salvador Terror is the given of the place The place is El Salvador in 1982, at the ghastly height of its civil war The writer is Joan Didion, who delivers an anatomy of that country s particular brand of terror its mechanisms, rationales, and intimate relation to United States foreign policy.As ash travels from battlefields to body dumps, interviews a puppet president, and considers the distinctly Salvadoran grammar of the verb to disappear, Didion gives us a book that is germane to any country in which bloodshed has become a standard tool of politics. New Read [ Salvador ] By [ Joan Didion ] For Kindle ePUB or eBook – groundhogwalking.co.uk

    15 thoughts on “↠ Salvador☆ Kindle Author ↠ Joan Didion georgian romance – groundhogwalking.co.uk

  1. Terror is the given of the placeJoan Didion, Salvador In 1983, when Salvador was first published, I was nine I remember those years as being ones where I heard about people disappeared, death squads, kidnappings, priests killed, nuns raped Who left me in front of the television It was the second major international crisis that became part of my childhood dreams I remember 3 5 years earlier, being freaked out by the Iran hostage crisis I was aware of angry protesters, machine guns, bliTerror is the given of the placeJoan Didion, Salvador In 1983, when Salvador was first published, I was nine I remember those years as being ones where I heard about people disappeared, death squads, kidnappings, priests killed, nuns raped Who left me in front of the television It was the second major international crisis that became part of my childhood dreams I remember 3 5 years earlier, being freaked out by the Iran hostage crisis I was aware of angry protesters, machine guns, blindfolds, the Ayatollah Khomeini s rants and a huge dark hole of uncertainty While the Iranian hostage crisis shares very little DIRECTLY with the civil war in El Salvador excepting the disgusting way people treat each other, the screwed up way that America dealt with both Central America El Salvador Nicaragua and Iran, and the lies we tell ourselves to pretend things are getting better these two countries did exist in my childhood nightmares The FMLN, death squads and...

  2. Didion s prose is precise and exquisite, but I struggled with her interpretation of her experience She argues against continued U.S involvement in El Salvador s civil war, which seems like the right argument, but one based primarily on her fear for her own safety understandable but not actually relevant to the formation of U.S policy and secondarily on her complete dismissal of the value of Salvadoran culture and, ultimately, Salvadoran lives Her story covers a two week time period durin Didion s prose is precise and exquisite, but I struggled with her interpretation of her experience She argues against continued U.S involvement in El Salvador s civil war, which seems like the right argument, but one based primarily on her fear for her own safety understandable but not actually relevant to the formation of U.S policy and secondarily on her complete dismissal of the value of Salvadoran culture and, ultimately, Salvadoran lives Her story covers a two week time period during which she overgeneralizes her own terror as the experience that all Salvadoran citizens must be having, yet the only Salvadorans whose stories she recounts are the ones currently in power who are likely afraid but f...

  3. If I were just judging Joan Didion s prose, it would be 5 stars every time But a few things about Salvador kept me from giving this book a 5 star rating.But first, a disclaimer I m half Salvadoran My American father and Salvadoran mother met in El Salvador and married in 77 and I was born in 79 in the States, just a few months after my parents decided to come back here That said, I ve never really spoken to them about the war I ve only actually only visited the country once, as a child, If I were just judging Joan Didion s prose, it would be 5 stars every time But a few things about Salvador kept me from giving this book a 5 star rating.But first, a disclaimer I m half Salvadoran My American father and Salvadoran mother met in El Salvador and married in 77 and I was born in 79 in the States, just a few months after my parents decided to come back here That said, I ve never really spoken to them about the war I ve only actually only visited the country once, as a child, while the war was still going...

  4. I ve always been in love with Joan Didion s reportage, with the dry, affectless, distanced language that suddenly, powerfully, yields razor sharp insights Salvador is the finest of her post 1960s writing a picture of a ghostly, fear haunted country at the beginning of the 1980s Didion catches the emptiness of official language and press releases, the utter and all consuming cynicism of a society where conspiracy is assumed and random death a fact of daily life, the empty streets and vill I ve always been in love with Joan Didion s reportage, with the dry, affectless, distanced language that suddenly, powerfully, yields razor sharp insights Salvador is the finest of her post 1960s writing a picture of a ghostly, fear haunted country at the beginning of the 1980s Didion catches the emptiness of official language and press releases, the utter and all consuming cynicism of a society where conspiracy is assumed and random death a fact of daily life, the empty streets and villages haunted ...

  5. Fine writing and terrifically atmospheric, but at thirty years remove, Didion s weary and wary apolitical stance her insistence that it s impossible to tell what s happening or who s responsible and that the violence is all pretty much aimless feels less like insight andlike giv...

  6. Okay, it is perhaps unfair to expect of what is clearly a minor work like Salvador the same thoroughgoing insight that Didion displays in her major non fiction books like Slouching Toward Bethlehem and The White Album That said, I was not impressed by this book Salvador made me realize that Didion is not, in fact, a natural reporter She is too reclusive, too depressive, and does not seem to thrive on human interaction and experience the way born reporters do This didn t matter for Slouching Okay, it is perhaps unfair to expect of what is clearly a minor work like Salvador the same thoroughgoing insight that Didion displays in her major non fiction books like Slouching Toward Bethlehem and The White Album That said, I was not impressed by this book Salvador made me realize that Didion is not, in fact, a natural reporter She is too reclusive, too depressive, and does not seem to thrive on human interaction and experience the way born reporters do This didn t matter for Slouching Toward Bethlehem, because it was essentially crticism, in which Didion could get by on her brilliant intelligence and total cultural mastery Not so for Salvador, in which Didion s mordant wit sours into mere cynicism.In order to be successful investigating a foreign culture, Didion would have to want to actually engage with that culture But that is not really what she wants to do here Instead, Didion sits in her hotel room, getting duly depressed by El Salvador and American foreign policy...

  7. 2.5 Stars The US is one of those countries which has interfered with or invaded so many countries within the last century that you sometimes lose track of some of the names There must be millions of American children out there who will be totally oblivious to their nation s role in the Salvadoran Civil War.Of course the US may well have been the strongest supporters of the Salvadoran military government, by 1984 Reagan had spent close to 1 billion in aid, but they were not alone, they were hel 2.5 Stars The US is one of those countries which has interfered with or invaded so many countries within the last century that you sometimes lose track of some of the names There must be millions of American children out there who will be totally oblivious to their nation s role in the Salvadoran Civil War.Of course the US may well have been the strongest supporters of the Salvadoran military government, by 1984 Reagan had spent close to 1 billion in aid, but they were not alone, they were helped by the Latin American dictators like Pinochet s Chile and Videla s Argentina.Didion gives a grim yet com...

  8. During the Reagan administration the United States committed itself to a policy of rollback as regards populist movements, particularly in the Americas We invaded Grenada and created proxy armies in Costa Rica and Honduras while attempting the overthrow of Nicaragua Unremarkably, we supported the dictatorships of Honduras, Guatemala and El Salvador against popular insurgencies.During this segment of the eighties I was very active politically, both with the Socialist Party and with solidarity g During the Reagan administration the United States committed itself to a policy of rollback as regards populist movements, particularly in the Americas We invaded Grenada and created proxy armies in Costa Rica and Honduras while attempting the overthrow of Nicaragua Unremarkably, we supported the dictatorships of Honduras, Guatemala and El Salvador against popular insurgencies.During this segment of the eighties I was very active politically, both with the Socialist Party and with solidarity groups at my school, Loyola University Chicago It was like VietNam all over again, like high school and college, except this...

  9. If I had read this book in the context of my Latin American history class, I would have appreciated its perspective The book is a valuable work of current events, or at least it was in the 80 s when it was published, but as a work of literature, I was unimpressed The 107 page book is filled with poorly integrated block quotes that could have been cut down There s hardly a story in the book As a reader, I was unsure what the narrator was doing in El Salvador in the first place I feel like sh If I had read this book in the context of my Latin American history class, I would have appreciated its perspective The book is a valuable work of current events, or at least it was in the 80 s when it was published, but as a work of literature, I was unimpressed The 107 page book is filled with poorly integrate...

  10. Joan Didion s nonfiction reportage can be tough to read Salvador is no exception My difficulty isn t with her subject matter, although it can be grim as it is here or simply excruciating as in her two most recent books covering the deaths of her husband and then her daughter It is because she produces such beautiful, fully formed and precisely balanced sentences that one at least this one can get bogged down in marveling at their perfection She portrays the sense of anomie, fear and drea Joan Didion s nonfiction reportage can be tough to read Salvador is no exception My difficulty isn t with her subject matter, although it can be grim as it is here or simply excruciating as in her two most recent books covering the deaths of her husband and then her daughter It is because she produces such beautiful, fully formed and precisely balanced sentences that one at least this one can get bogged down in marveling at their perfection She portrays the sense of anomie, fear...

  11. Ah, Madame Didion, how I love the way you take something visceral and awful, and write it as if you were observing it from a bathysphere, smirking and chain smoking El Salvador, as we know knew, is was a wreck The point is that, as a privileged American, you can t possibly claim to feel what the people are feeling, or to write objectively about a situation that your own government, via its local proxy, refuses to let you examine objectively Instead, the only way to approach the situation Ah, Madame Didion, how I love the way you take something visceral and awful, and write it as if you were observing it from a bathysphere, smirking and chain smoking El Salvador, as we know knew, is was a wreck The point is that, as a privileged American, you can t possibly claim to feel what the people are feeling, or to write objectively about a situation that your own gov...

  12. I can t say I enjoyed reading it because enjoy is the wrong wrong, but I found it very interesting It had a little bit of a how I spent my summer vacation feel, but when the smartest person in the room tells you about their trip to a war zone, you listen She doesn t really lay out the history of our involvement in El Salvador, I guess because you are supposed to already know that My favorite part was the analysis of Gabriel Garcia Marquez I really was not expecting that I thought she migh I can t say I enjoyed reading it because enjoy is the wrong wrong, but I found it very interesting It had a little bit of a how I spent my summer vacation feel, but when the smartest person in the room tells you about their trip to a war zone, you listen She doesn t really lay out the history of our involvement in El Salvador, I guess because you are supposed to already know that My favorite part was the analysis of Gabriel Garcia Marquez I really was not e...

  13. Amazing writing and a deep understanding of Latin American politics.

  14. Evocative of the the government s barbarous menace at the time And maybe again, now.

  15. Among Americans in El Salvador there is an endemic apprehension of danger in the apparently benign Didion s insight often manages to point to the future, with an eerie and surreal twist Salvador proves the opacity of what s already hidden, and somehow what s to come.